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Championship Productions Featured Items!

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    with Corbin Stone, Pleasant Valley (IA) High School Head Boys Soccer Coach;
    former Drake University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    3x Missouri Valley Conference Women's Soccer Coach of the Year, 4x Missouri Valley Conference Champions; Iowa Youth Soccer Association Coach of the Year (1999)

    In the modern game of soccer, teams are using more flexible, adaptive defenses. As a result, teams must be able to attack in a variety of ways and understand the concepts involved in countering, transitioning quickly, circulating and building play, combining and making the final pass to score goals.

    Teams must understand specific ways to create and score goals. In this presentation, Corbin Stone covers:

    • width and depth in attack
    • countering on the break
    • circulating the ball and building
    • setting and adjusting the pace of the game
    • attacking and combining in the final third
    • movement off the ball in attack
    • improvising in attack

    Many presentations on attacking soccer focus on only one aspect of play, such as the counter attack. Coach Stone uses five different activities to focus on several different principles of play.

    There's no need to purchase separate videos on how to counter, how to combine in final third, how and when to slow pace of game down. This presentation is an all-in-one package that will help your players attack more efficiently and effectively.

    91 minutes. 2015.


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    with Corbin Stone, Pleasant Valley (IA) High School Head Boys Soccer Coach;
    former Drake University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    3x Missouri Valley Conference Women's Soccer Coach of the Year, 4x Missouri Valley Conference Champions; Iowa Youth Soccer Association Coach of the Year (1999)

    Being a successful coach means helping different types of players understand the basic skills and concepts involved in playing the game. Coaching Methods for Soccer provides a brief overview of the communication tools and methods required to teach various techniques and tactics in soccer.

    Knowing the X's and O's is only part of the battle. Understanding all the coaching points and mechanics involved with the skills and techniques of soccer is not enough to articulate and transmit that knowledge. You need to know how to expose players to your expertise. Different players and circumstances require different teaching methods. Some players respond better to seeing the technique or concept in action while others learn by hearing about it.

    Coach Stone highlights four basic methods to better reach your players and become a more effective and efficient coach. With each method, you get five different communication tools. Each method also features practice footage that clearly illustrates the communication tool, showing you the benefits and how to implement it.

    Players cannot meet your expectations if they do not understand them. The best way for your athletes to understand them is to practice; to work on the problems they are having. Simply providing solutions to the problems is not enough; players need to see, feel, hear, and practice these in environments where you are directing and managing the learning process. Several methods can be used to better teach and reach your players. When coaches can clearly, effectively and efficiently articulate their expectations and knowledge, their players are more likely to implement ideas, techniques and skills that lead to greater results and understanding.

    Coaches are teachers, artists and scientists. The field is their classroom, canvass and laboratory. As a coach, you cannot be a one-trick pony. This presentation offers ways for you to become a more effective communicator, demonstrator and educator on the field.

    47 minutes. 2015.


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    with Corbin Stone, Pleasant Valley (IA) High School Head Boys Soccer Coach;
    former Drake University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    3x Missouri Valley Conference Women's Soccer Coach of the Year, 4x Missouri Valley Conference Champions; Iowa Youth Soccer Association Coach of the Year (1999)

    To achieve success and play faster, players must know how to receive and pass the ball accurately, effectively and efficiently under pressure. Using technical execution in isolation, Corbin Stone shares coaching points and highlights the mechanics involved in performing various passing and receiving techniques. He breaks down how to properly pass the ball over a short distance and long distance, the proper technique to strike a ball with the inside and outside portion of your feet, and how to make a ball you've just received go in the direction you want.

    Coach Stone begins with live practice footage of his youth team. Then, moving through an analysis of practice footage of older players and finally on to his own real-time, slow-motion demonstrations of the techniques being emphasized, he provides thorough, detailed instruction in six areas:

    Inside Foot Passing
    Coach Stone breaks down the proper way to approach a ball and how to keep it on the ground. He also discusses how to open up your ankle and knee, which are important to keeping the ball on the ground and striking through the middle of the ball.

    Outside Foot Passing
    In this progression from the inside foot, Coach Stone shares passing drills using the outside portion of the foot, which can create deception during a game. He shows how to bend the ball around a defender or into a player's run. Again, the approach to the ball is important. A straight on approach makes it harder for the defender to tell which foot you will use to pass.

    Passing Over Distance on the Ground
    The passing drill teaches players how to keep the ball on the ground over a certain distance. To be able to keep the ball on the ground is important for the receiving player. The technique used is to approach the ball at an angle or straight on.

    Passing Over Distance in the Air
    In the air it's important to swing from the hip and get your foot underneath the ball to make it airborne. Follow through and point of contact is also important, as this segment demonstrates.

    Receiving the Ball on the Ground
    This receiving drill is done using the inside part of your foot and opening your body. It's also effective for making the first touch away from a defender to set up the next pass or dribble.

    Receiving the Ball out of the Air
    In this partners' drill, one player serves and the other player works on the technique. After the ball has been served, the receiver takes it out of the air with their chest or foot. The two techniques used in this drill are the inside part of the foot and outside part of the foot to touch away from pressure.

    Using clear, effective language and a blend of practice footage, video analysis, and real-time, slow motion demonstration, Coach Stone gives you and your players a wealth of resources for improving two essential components of the modern game.

    64 minutes. 2015.


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    RD-04730A: with Corbin Stone, Pleasant Valley (IA) High School Head Boys Soccer Coach;
    former Drake University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    3x Missouri Valley Conference Women's Soccer Coach of the Year, 4x Missouri Valley Conference Champions; Iowa Youth Soccer Association Coach of the Year (1999)

    Being a successful coach means helping different types of players understand the basic skills and concepts involved in playing the game. Coaching Methods for Soccer provides a brief overview of the communication tools and methods required to teach various techniques and tactics in soccer.

    Knowing the X's and O's is only part of the battle. Understanding all the coaching points and mechanics involved with the skills and techniques of soccer is not enough to articulate and transmit that knowledge. You need to know how to expose players to your expertise. Different players and circumstances require different teaching methods. Some players respond better to seeing the technique or concept in action while others learn by hearing about it.

    Coach Stone highlights four basic methods to better reach your players and become a more effective and efficient coach. With each method, you get five different communication tools. Each method also features practice footage that clearly illustrates the communication tool, showing you the benefits and how to implement it.

    Players cannot meet your expectations if they do not understand them. The best way for your athletes to understand them is to practice; to work on the problems they are having. Simply providing solutions to the problems is not enough; players need to see, feel, hear, and practice these in environments where you are directing and managing the learning process. Several methods can be used to better teach and reach your players. When coaches can clearly, effectively and efficiently articulate their expectations and knowledge, their players are more likely to implement ideas, techniques and skills that lead to greater results and understanding.

    Coaches are teachers, artists and scientists. The field is their classroom, canvass and laboratory. As a coach, you cannot be a one-trick pony. This presentation offers ways for you to become a more effective communicator, demonstrator and educator on the field.

    47 minutes. 2015.



    RD-04730B: with Corbin Stone, Pleasant Valley (IA) High School Head Boys Soccer Coach;
    former Drake University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    3x Missouri Valley Conference Women's Soccer Coach of the Year, 4x Missouri Valley Conference Champions; Iowa Youth Soccer Association Coach of the Year (1999)

    In the modern game of soccer, teams are using more flexible, adaptive defenses. As a result, teams must be able to attack in a variety of ways and understand the concepts involved in countering, transitioning quickly, circulating and building play, combining and making the final pass to score goals.

    Teams must understand specific ways to create and score goals. In this presentation, Corbin Stone covers:

    • width and depth in attack
    • countering on the break
    • circulating the ball and building
    • setting and adjusting the pace of the game
    • attacking and combining in the final third
    • movement off the ball in attack
    • improvising in attack

    Many presentations on attacking soccer focus on only one aspect of play, such as the counter attack. Coach Stone uses five different activities to focus on several different principles of play.

    There's no need to purchase separate videos on how to counter, how to combine in final third, how and when to slow pace of game down. This presentation is an all-in-one package that will help your players attack more efficiently and effectively.

    91 minutes. 2015.



    RD-04730C: with Corbin Stone, Pleasant Valley (IA) High School Head Boys Soccer Coach;
    former Drake University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    3x Missouri Valley Conference Women's Soccer Coach of the Year, 4x Missouri Valley Conference Champions; Iowa Youth Soccer Association Coach of the Year (1999)

    Using a blend of practice footage and video analysis, Corbin Stone breaks down the specific physical mechanics of shooting, crossing, and heading (both offensive and defensive). His instruction gives clear, effective tools and coaching points for developing your team's finishing in the offensive third and heading all over the field.

    Coach Stone begins with practice footage of his youth team. Then, moving on to an analysis of practice footage of older players that highlight the techniques being emphasized, the presentation provides detailed instruction on the technical components in three areas:

    Shooting:
    Players who cannot shoot or finish cannot score goals. Coach Stone breaks down the key mechanical components of shooting for accuracy and from a distance. He emphasizes several key coaching points for developing strong, accurate player shots including knee position, "plant-foot" location, "foot strike" surface and position on landing.

    Crossing:
    Serving the ball from wide positions is a difficult but important skill if teams want to attack with width. Coach Stone provides clear, detailed technical instruction on how to deliver a variety of crosses into the penalty area and across the goal. Highlighting the importance of body position and attacking the end line, Coach Stone and his players demonstrate both "do's" and "don'ts" for services into the area.

    Heading:
    Players who do not know how to head the ball properly risk injury. Coach Stone gives detailed instruction on correct body positioning and target surfaces for defensive and offensive heading. You'll get key facets of body and foot positioning to deliver effective headers in both offensive and defensive situations.

    Coach Stone's instruction will help you and your players target specific mechanical components of your finishing and heading to improve your play all over the field.

    47 minutes. 2015.



    RD-04730D: with Corbin Stone, Pleasant Valley (IA) High School Head Boys Soccer Coach;
    former Drake University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    3x Missouri Valley Conference Women's Soccer Coach of the Year, 4x Missouri Valley Conference Champions; Iowa Youth Soccer Association Coach of the Year (1999)

    To achieve success and play faster, players must know how to receive and pass the ball accurately, effectively and efficiently under pressure. Using technical execution in isolation, Corbin Stone shares coaching points and highlights the mechanics involved in performing various passing and receiving techniques. He breaks down how to properly pass the ball over a short distance and long distance, the proper technique to strike a ball with the inside and outside portion of your feet, and how to make a ball you've just received go in the direction you want.

    Coach Stone begins with live practice footage of his youth team. Then, moving through an analysis of practice footage of older players and finally on to his own real-time, slow-motion demonstrations of the techniques being emphasized, he provides thorough, detailed instruction in six areas:

    Inside Foot Passing
    Coach Stone breaks down the proper way to approach a ball and how to keep it on the ground. He also discusses how to open up your ankle and knee, which are important to keeping the ball on the ground and striking through the middle of the ball.

    Outside Foot Passing
    In this progression from the inside foot, Coach Stone shares passing drills using the outside portion of the foot, which can create deception during a game. He shows how to bend the ball around a defender or into a player's run. Again, the approach to the ball is important. A straight on approach makes it harder for the defender to tell which foot you will use to pass.

    Passing Over Distance on the Ground
    The passing drill teaches players how to keep the ball on the ground over a certain distance. To be able to keep the ball on the ground is important for the receiving player. The technique used is to approach the ball at an angle or straight on.

    Passing Over Distance in the Air
    In the air it's important to swing from the hip and get your foot underneath the ball to make it airborne. Follow through and point of contact is also important, as this segment demonstrates.

    Receiving the Ball on the Ground
    This receiving drill is done using the inside part of your foot and opening your body. It's also effective for making the first touch away from a defender to set up the next pass or dribble.

    Receiving the Ball out of the Air
    In this partners' drill, one player serves and the other player works on the technique. After the ball has been served, the receiver takes it out of the air with their chest or foot. The two techniques used in this drill are the inside part of the foot and outside part of the foot to touch away from pressure.

    Using clear, effective language and a blend of practice footage, video analysis, and real-time, slow motion demonstration, Coach Stone gives you and your players a wealth of resources for improving two essential components of the modern game.

    64 minutes. 2015.




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    with Doug Elder, Midwestern State University Head Coach;
    winningest active coach in NCAA Division II soccer; 7x conference champions; 6x Regional Coach of the Year

    Your team's ability to play fast creates positive numbers when you attack. By coaching with an emphasis on getting numbers forward, Doug Elder has led his team to success after success as they gain advantage at the point of transition.

    Coach Elder shares a set of fast-paced drills that he uses to coach his players to always be moving and thinking at full speed. This develops the mindset required to create "numbers up" situations to gain advantage on the soccer field. Coach Elder's drills achieve two goals: Increasing the size of the grid works the counter attack and also enhances fitness levels. Starting with basic concepts and building to functional game play, you'll learn how to train players to consistently build numerical advantages as soon as they gain ball control. Here are just a few of the drills included in this exciting presentation:

    • 1v1 to goal - Executed at game speed, this drill develops an attacking mindset when transitioning from defense to offense or vice versa.
    • 2v1 - This is a fast-paced drill that presents game-like situations where an attacker could make a pass.
    • Transition drill - Players work on possession while playing fast to develop a great touch, communication, and transitioning fast from offense to defense.
    • 5v5 game - Players must play the ball forward to their striker before they can score, forcing them to look forward and attack the defense.

    Before moving to an on-field demonstration, Coach Elder uses animated graphics to stress his coaching points. He also shows how to vary drills to get the desired results. His drills are progressive, easy to transition between and enjoyable for players execute. A secondary benefit of Coach Elder's drills is the conditioning element. The fast-paced transition requires players to stay connected to the play to give 100 percent lest they let their teammates down.

    This is a great presentation for coaches who want to see their players practicing at full speed while executing simple drills.

    79 minutes. 2015.


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    with Indi Cowie, Professional Soccer Freestyler
    Indi has appeared on the Ellen DeGeneres Show, Good Morning America and has been featured on ESPN, AOL's "You've Got..." and the "Talented Youth of America" edition of the New York Times Magazine; performed at halftime in front of 76,000 fans during a Man Utd and Chelsea match at Old Trafford

    Freestyle soccer combines sport with art. It's a way for athletes to be creative and have fun while perfecting their soccer skills. Professional Soccer Freestyler, Indi Cowie, reveals over 20 of her favorite freestyle soccer moves that you can practice and perfect.

    Indi teaches and demonstrates a variety of freestyle soccer moves including stalls, catches, and juggles. These moves speed up your foot skills in a fun, challenging environment.

    With Indi's in-depth explanation and progressions, you will learn the key techniques, breakdowns and tricks you need to successfully perform each move.

    As a coach, you can use these concepts to keep your players engaged in practice and eager to work with the ball. Freestyle soccer dramatically improves a player's first touch. Regular soccer "juggling" and keepy-up improves control of the ball in only 2-dimensions. Freestyle soccer provides 3-dimensional ball movement and improves a player's ability to control the ball quickly from any area around their body and with any surface.

    Freestyle soccer also significantly improves a player's confidence with a ball and develops a creative mind set. It also encourages players to spend time working with a ball on their own - ALL YOU NEED IS A BALL!

    Have fun and push your boundaries as a soccer player while being creative and developing your first touch on the ball. See what new freestyle soccer moves you can learn and perform using this world class presentation!

    58 minutes. 2015.


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  • 07/19/15--22:00: Attacking Soccer
  • edited by Jay Miller

    The key to success in soccer is solid, well-rounded attacking skills. And in today's game all 11 players on the field, not just the strikers, need to be proficient in attacking play. Strikers must master the technical and tactical skills, finding new ways to put the ball between the goalposts. Defenders must be willing and able to move forward and join in attacks. Even goalkeepers must know how to launch and coordinate a counterattack. In Attacking Soccer, the sport's top coaches, including Anson Dorrance, Ken Lolla, Bobby Clark, and Tony DiCicco, share high-powered offensive tactics for intermediate to advanced players. Through drills, diagrams, and personal insights, these experts cover all facets attacking game play, including individual skills, shooting, finishing advice, and team possession strategies. Topics include:

    • Attacking from the flanks
    • Crossing and attack heading
    • Direct and indirect free kicks
    • Capitalizing on corner kicks and throw-ins
    • Maintaining team possession
    • Attacking from the defensive third

    Each coach has included favorite drills so that you can practice the same attacking skills used with elite players. Attacking Soccer is the definitive guide for breaking down defenses and consistent offensive performance.

    192 pages. 2014.


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  • 07/19/15--22:00: Soccer Anatomy
  • BY Donald T. Kirkendall, member of FIFA's Medical Assessment and Research Centre

    Take an inside look at the world's most popular sport. Soccer Anatomy will show you how to elevate your game by increasing strength, speed, and agility for more accurate passes and powerful shots.

    Soccer Anatomy includes 79 exercises, each with step-by-step descriptions and full-color anatomical illustrations highlighting muscles in action.

    Soccer Anatomy goes beyond exercises by placing you on the pitch and in the game. Illustrations of the active muscles involved in kicking, heading, tackling, and diving show you how each exercise is fundamentally linked to soccer performance.

    From attacking to defending to goalkeeping, Soccer Anatomy will improve every aspect of your game. You'll learn how to modify exercises to target specific areas based on your style of play, personal needs, and goals. And you can prepare for competition by minimizing injuries using a system developed by FIFA's medical research program.

    Combining authoritative advice, expert instruction, and stunning four-color illustrations, Soccer Anatomy is truly an inside look at this one-of-a-kind sport. Whether you're a player, coach, or fan, if you're serious about soccer, this is one book you need to own.

    224 PAGES. 2011.


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  • 07/19/15--22:00: Soccer Speed
  • by Dick Bate,
    head of the Cardiff City FC Youth Academy and is the former director of elite coaching for the English Football Associatio (FA)

    and Ian Jeffreys,
    proprietor and performance director of All-Pro Performance based in Brecon, Wales; a world-renowned authority on speed and agility development

    The world's most popular sport is also one of the most demanding. Stronger, smarter, and more agile players have increased the intensity and tempo of the game. Success hinges on the ability to read, react, and execute. For individual players and teams alike, speed is a necessity.

    Soccer Speed is a groundbreaking work-more than a training guide, but an all-encompassing execution plan for success in today's aggressive, attacking, and fast-paced game.

    Inside, you'll learn how to develop these skills:

    • Quickness, agility, and balance for defending, attacking, reacting, and executing
    • Most effective techniques, such as heel passes and stride changes, to challenge opponents and keep them off balance
    • Soccer intelligence, or the ability to instantly recognize and exploit the opposition's weakness
    • In-game decision making with and without the ball

    Every aspect of the game is covered, including step-by-step instruction and 36 drills for developing technical and tactical speed in passing, receiving, dribbling, scoring, counterattacking, and defending. Soccer Speed is the one and only guide for outpacing, outsmarting, and outplaying the opposition.

    216 pages. 2015.


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    with Greg Gatz, Director of Strength and Conditioning for Olympic sports at the University of North Carolina

    Increase strength to dribble through traffic. Pack more power into shots on goal. Improve quickness and agility to find open passing lanes and evade opponents. Complete Conditioning for Soccer shows you how to achieve all of these performance goals and more.

    Soccer players are faster and stronger than ever before. In this special book and DVD package, renowned soccer strength and conditioning coach Greg Gatz provides a comprehensive training approach that builds players' physical abilities as well as the soccer-specific skills required for dribbling, tackling, passing, heading, shooting, and goalkeeping.

    Complete with assessment tests for determining a players' fitness status and specific programs that improve balance, quickness, agility, speed, and strength, this book will help you dominate your position. The DVD puts the training into action by demonstrating key tests, exercises, and drills from the book.

    With nutritional guidelines as well as seasonal workouts, Complete Conditioning for Soccer provides a multidimensional training approach that will show you how to get the most from your time in the gym and on the pitch.

    Book/DVD combo (208 pages/64 minutes). 2008.


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    with Brian McMahon,
    Palm Beach Atlantic University Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Elite Eight and NCAA South Region Champions, 2014 NCCAA Final Four and NCCAA South Region Champions, 2012 NAIA National Champions, 2012 NSCAA and the NAIA National Coach of the Year, over 300 wins at the collegiate coaching level

    One of the biggest tactical dilemmas is creating numerical superiority when attacking. One of the best ways of doing this is to switch the point of attack.

    Through a series of exercises, Brian McMahon demonstrates how he teaches his players to switch play and create a numbers up advantage through multi-gate switching games. He shows a clear progression that will help your team switch the point of attack quickly to gain numbers up throughout the pitch.

    Coach McMahon provides in-depth illustrations, both on a white board and on the field, to show how to use the switch, starting from unopposed to full-sided games. You will learn how to properly warm up your team and how to teach your players the correct body position to switch. He also discusses when to attack with pace and when to slow it down and be patient.

    Warm-Up

    The emphasis in Coach McMahon's United Warm Up is to prepare players for the physical load of the session. Some of the areas he covers include dynamic movements, static stretching, speed ladder and SAQ (speed, agility and quickness).

    Channel Game

    The Channel Game is a 5v5v5 small sided game that forces the team in possession to move the ball quickly and switch the play by manipulating the field. This is an excellent exercise to start right after a warm-up to get your players focused on switching the ball quickly.

    Four Gates Game

    The Four Gates Game is a dynamic drill that keeps your players sharp and focused. It starts out as a 4v4 game, but can increase into a 7v4 based on how quickly your team can keep possession and switch the point of attack. This small sided game creates many opportunities for players to train on switching and on-field awareness.

    Six Gates Game

    Coach McMahon puts everything together in a 6v6 small sided game. He demonstrates different progressions that incorporate all aspects of switching in a functional way.

    Coach McMahon creates a fun, competitive environment that allows his players to have repeated success at switching the point of attack. Throughout the video, he stresses quick play, movement off the ball, and the importance of keeping the ball on the ground. Above all, he does a good job encouraging quick play without forcing the ball, allowing the ball to be switched with greater success.

    58 minutes. 2016.


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    with Brian McMahon,
    Palm Beach Atlantic University Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Elite Eight and NCAA South Region Champions, 2014 NCCAA Final Four and NCCAA South Region Champions, 2012 NAIA National Champions, 2012 NSCAA and the NAIA National Coach of the Year, over 300 wins at the collegiate coaching level

    The best teams in the world are dangerous in the attack and well-organized defensively, but they also have the ability to make quick transitions. Top level teams like Atletico Madrid, Dortmund, and Chelsea under Jose Mourinho were known for the way they used transition.

    Teaching a team to instinctively transition and react positively to moments of change can be challenging. Brian McMahon introduces the concept of a holistic team approach to executing transitions through innovative, progressive training exercises. Coach McMahon differentiates his training approach by incorporating an attacking, up-tempo style that has made his team an attacking threat in Division II with over 80 goals in 2015.

    Coach McMahon demonstrates five transition exercises that will help your team not only attack with lightning pace, but also transition quickly and get organized behind the ball. Coach McMahon provides in-depth illustrations, both on a white board and on the field, where techniques and tips are shared before the exercise is introduced. The exercises are simplified, which allows you to teach main points of the drill as variations are added in order to gain technical teaching opportunities.

    The teaching points emphasized during the exercises include:

    • Quick speed of play and ball circulation to break teams down
    • How to quickly organize your teams for transitional play
    • The technical aspects to keep possession of the ball both as an individual and as a team
    • How to defend to quickly start a counter attack

    The progressive nature of Coach McMahon's training exercises enable players to pick up the principles of transition piece by piece. The activities build in a sophisticated package of concepts. Team and individual competition is expertly weaved into Coach McMahon's training approach. The activities inject an element of competition, which raises the standard of play.

    Exercises include:

    • 5v2 Rondo (keep away) Drill - Incorporating the entire team in a competitive, yet dynamic environment, the Rondo Drill trains players to develop a sense of rhythm in possession and maintain a high level of speed of play to move to the next grid.
    • Bayern Munich Drill - An unopposed passing pattern that teaches players to prepare their body to receive the ball and improve one- and two-touch passing. Coach McMahon shows four progressions to this passing pattern, which leads to a nine-pass combination for players to work on quick ball circulation, through balls and the timing of supporting runs.
    • Transition Possessions - This small sided game keeps your players on their feet and alert to transition at a moment's notice. Coach McMahon separates his players into three teams with one team ready to quickly transition on the field from the outside. Players try to keep possession for a certain amount of passes before the defending team has to transition.
    • Transition to Goal - Game situation drill where each team must think about which goal to defend when transitioning onto the field. This drill uses elements of previous drills to demonstrate game-like play. Coach McMahan shows variations and restrictions that can be included in this game.

    On average, there are over 200 transitional moments during a game, and it's important to master and take advantage of those moments to be successful. This video will teach you how important it is to attack with pace and how quick your team needs to be to get in good defensive positions when they lose possession of the ball.

    64 minutes. 2016.


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    with Brian McMahon,
    Palm Beach Atlantic University Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Elite Eight and NCAA South Region Champions, 2014 NCCAA Final Four and NCCAA South Region Champions, 2012 NAIA National Champions, 2012 NSCAA and the NAIA National Coach of the Year, over 300 wins at the collegiate coaching level

    One of the hardest skills in the game of soccer is finishing. Brian McMahon shows you how to teach finishing and how he's turned his team into an attacking threat. In 2015, Palm Beach Atlantic scored 84 goals and led the NCAA D-II in goals per game.

    You'll learn how to teach finishing using games that incorporate the whole team in functional examples. The teaching points Coach McMahon emphasizes during the games include:

    • Movement off the ball to create the spaces needed to be dangerous in the attacking 3rd
    • Placement vs Power in certain areas of the field
    • The technical aspects of finishing in and around the 18 yard box
    • How the use of 1-2 touch, combination play and speed of play can be vital when going to the goal to finish

    Coach McMahon goes beyond simply showing you how to finish. He also shows you how to build up to goal scoring opportunities. You'll learn the technique for finishing in terms of placement vs power and the proper runs that need to be made in the box when attacking the goal. Coach McMahon's drills incorporate the whole team - not just forwards/strikers. He teaches how combination play and speed of play can help you gain an extra advantage when finishing. Drills include:

    • Wine Glass - The emphasis in this particular drill is to help players develop a sense of rhythm in quick combination play. Within the exercise, Coach McMahon shows five progressions and demonstrates how to use quick combination play to release players to finish on goal.
    • Progressions - Coach McMahon demonstrates various patterns to use in a functional/positional setting and using third man combinations to go to goal. This passing pattern drill creates opportunities for field players to finish and train different combinations to break down compact defenses in the final third.
    • Forward Check Game - Coach McMahon puts everything together in this small-sided game. He shows four progressions that incorporate all the areas he covered earlier in the video. He shows 3v1, 4v2, 5v3 and other variations to play off your high target player and how to attack going forward in the final third.

    Coach McMahon provides in-depth illustrations, both on a white board and on the field, that will help you create an attack that will strike fear into your opponents!

    "What I like most about this video from Coach McMahon is that he shows how he builds from passing pattern combinations to finishing to goal using the WHOLE team instead of just a few forwards on your team." - Customer Review

    61 minutes. 2016.


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    with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 10 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15), 4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 12x Conference Champs

    Attacking soccer means successful soccer in today's game. Teams that attack effectively and as a unit present a constant problem for their opponents. Teaching players to attack as a team is a priority for every coach.

    In a high-octane training session, Jay Entlich demonstrates how to develop the skills necessary to get your players to attack as a team. He uses four phases to build his players' repertoire of offensive attacking strategies. In a progression from small group to full field, Coach Entlich's attacking phases promote opportunities to advance the ball utilizing counterattacks, overlapping, combination play, and number advantages.

    Coach Entlich makes it easy to follow his training session by thoroughly explaining each activity before taking it onto the field with his players.

    Phase 1: 3-2-1 Small-Sided Game

    Coach Entlich uses limited space and numbers to instill the basic principles needed to effectively move through the three zones commonly used in team organization. He introduces a fast-paced 6v3 possession game where offensive players move from one zone to another to creative number advantages and use overlapping runs and combination play to maintain possession. Possession maintained from one end to the other restarts the drill seamlessly, and with ways for both the offense and defense to score points, the game creates the kind of competition in practice that players and coaches love.

    Phase 2: Half Field Exercises

    In Phase 2, the training progress to activities in the final third, emphasizing player decision making and organization to stretch and break down an opponent's defensive organization. Coach Entlich designs the drill to mimic a 4-3-3 formation attacking a 3-5-2 formation, but you could easily adapt the drill to put your players in the formation that best suits your team. With seamless transitions and minimal downtime, this drill will test your players mentally and physically.

    Phase 3: 11v9 Full-Field Play

    Phase 3 moves Coach Entlich's team to the full field, where any turnover results in an 11v9 counterattacking opportunity. This activity sharpens play in and throughout the midfield. Coach Entlich teaches proper supporting runs, driving at a defense, finding the open player and having defenders become part of the attack. Whether it's by overlapping or combination play, your team will learn to create number advantages moving toward the goal

    Phase 4: Full-Field Scrimmage

    Coach Entlich returns the game to the players in 11v11 play, illustrating the effectiveness of concepts taught in the training session.

    Each of Coach Entlich's phases require his players to think on their feet. During each phase, he finds moments in the drills to instruct his players on everything from the proper run to which foot to make a pass with.

    The concepts and activities presented in this training session will teach your players the principles of an attacking mindset to generate scoring opportunities and cause constant problems for your opponents.

    "I have a number of attack oriented training videos and this is a very tightly organized and logical training progression that emphasizes the essential principles of prioritizing player decision making, movement off the ball and finding or creating situations where I have a numerical advantage to attack my opponent. It is a good, solid team tactical training video." - Customer Review

    52 minutes. 2016.


    0 0
  • 05/07/18--22:00: Possession to Penetrate
  • with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 10 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15), 4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 12x Conference Champs

    In order to build an attack a team must learn how to possess the ball.

    Jay Entlich shows how to create a possession-oriented session. In three phases, he teaches players to recognize when to keep the ball and when to advance it up the field. Using a progression of small-sided games your players will learn how to retain the ball.

    Develop Soccer Decision Making

    The professional players that thrive in possession-oriented systems are not just some of the most skilled, they are also the ones that make the best decisions on the field. Coach Entlich demonstrates three games with variations that require players to think quickly and succeed mentally while keeping the ball. Players must be able to make quick decisions about when to pass forward and when to pass back. Each game in Coach Entlich's training sessions has players move the ball back and forth between zones to simulate moving the ball between the different levels of a formation.

    Speed of play is vital as the ball moves quickly when being passed. To improve speed of play, players must relocate when the ball travels to open up for their teammates. Coach Entlich comes back to this point throughout the video and his games show how vital this skill is to maintaining possession.

    Teach Possession Skills M

    The focus of this video is on the mental aspect of possessing the ball, but that doesn't mean that Coach Entlich ignores the physical skills necessary to keep the ball. He finds teachable moments in each drill throughout the training session to reinforce skills that make keeping possession easier.

    In order to maintain possession, players need to have a great first touch and position their bodies to receive a ball and move it quickly to a teammate. Coach Entlich finds opportunities in the ebb and flow of the games to coach his players.

    Position-Specific Training

    While many possession drills confine players to a box, Coach Entlich emphasizes functionality by putting players in their natural positions. Each game features a player in a target role, and others put emphasis on a holding midfielder. Coach Entlich's final game requires a back four to maintain possession and connect with a three-player midfield who look to keep the ball before finding a target forward. When your players experience success possessing the ball in their role in practice, success in games is the next step.

    The games Coach Entlich demonstrate will sharpen your players' mental and physical skills on the field. Starting with small passes in tight spaces, to playing in a fast-paced exercise that encourages lines of play to work together, you will be able to teach your team how to possess and advance the ball successfully.

    55 minutes. 2016.


    0 0

    with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 10 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15), 4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 12x Conference Champs

    Jay Entlich shows you how to incorporate the 3-5-2 system of play into your program. He breaks the system down into three phases and explains each in detail before taking the field for a live practice.

    You'll learn how to position players based on defensive pressure on the ball. These tactics will give your team options no matter what situation or position they're in.

    Throughout Coach Entlich's 3-5-2 practice session, he keeps 22 players participating in the game for the entire practice. He uses "in-game" coaching points to teach individuals and also stops play occasionally to make team tactical points.

    Phase I - Getting used to the System of Play for a 3-5-2

    Phase I is an unopposed phase, which allows your players to get used to the nuances of positional reads as the game develops. Coach Entlich makes coaching points during play as well as stop action rehearsals as players get used to how they fit in the system.

    Phase II - Adds opposition and forces players to think and make decisions on the fly

    Phase II adds opposition playing in the same formation, but with an adjustment in the midfield that gives you two options on how to play the system.

      One style is more aggressive, using two attacking central midfielders.The other style is more defensive, using two defending central midfielders.

    Coach Entlich sets up an activity that helps bring out individual positional play and descriptions so all players can understand their roles and those of their teammates.

    Phase III - The real game!

    Phase III advances to two teams with goalkeepers in a real game, but with a modification to emphasize the key advantages to using the 3-5-2 system of play. Coach Entlich has players work on playing through the center of the field so when one team is in possession, the other team must have two of their center mids kneel down. This creates an advantage and promotes success in the attack. Your players will absorb and adapt to the formation while being totally engaged in playing the real game.

    This video is a complete dissection of the 3-5-2 style of play and a step-by-step method to incorporate it into your program. Your team will learn the expected runs of all supporting players, how to make decisions on the fly, combining to beat defenders and how to place the ball into dangerous areas.

    68 minutes. 2016.


    0 0

    with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 10 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15), 4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 12x Conference Champs

    Scoring more goals is the intent of all teams. This video focuses on how you can make that happen for your team. Jay Entlich shows how to create a goal scoring session using three phases and teaches players to recognize why they are missing shots on frame. Using a progression of free shooting, shooting with defense and shooting in a small-sided game, your players will learn when and how to take their best shot on goal.

    Each progression contains variations that allow you to utilize the same rotation. This cuts down on lost time and confusion as you progress through each drill.

    Developing Runs off the Ball

    Starting with a non-defended shooting drill, Coach Entlich breaks down finishing into three different phases. He emphasizes the two main components of finishing:

  • Technique - how you strike a ball.
  • Tactics - when you shoot the ball and how to put yourself in the best place to finish.
  • He keeps instructions "over the top" and keeps play moving and active. He clearly demonstrates when and how to "show" for the ball and when to spread the field for wide play. Your players will learn the visual and verbal cues to improve shooting.

    Combination Play to "Go to Goal" and Increase Scoring Opportunities

    The progression of activities moves from unopposed to 1v1 and builds in a logical progression to 2v2, 3v3, 4v4 and 5v5. The activities get more complex as more players are added, but the coaching points made in the unopposed and 1v1 play are applicable as the numbers increase. Coach Entlich moves the session along from discussing angles of the target forward and their preparation touch, to players competing in restricted areas against defense to apply what they learned in the first two phases.

    Practice builds up to players being put in situations where they have to make decisions on when to take shots and finding the best opportunities to finish. The progression includes many teaching movements:

    • Don't hit under the ball.
    • Don't reach for the ball on a shot.
    • Try to stay central as much as possible when putting a shot on frame.

    Developing the Outside Attack Option

    Coach Entlich spend considerable time showing and teaching the use the outside attack option from player positioning to the supporting runs by players off the ball. His progression is easy to follow and very logical. Your players will learn the importance of stretching the width of the attack for added chances to play the ball into dangerous shooting spaces.

    Coach Entlich has an answer for all finishing problems and provides specific tips for how to take on a defender and get a shot off. This is a great video for any coach looking to improve their team's effectiveness around the net.

    53 minutes. 2016.


    0 0

    RD-05024A: with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 10 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15), 4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 12x Conference Champs

    Jay Entlich shows you how to incorporate the 3-5-2 system of play into your program. He breaks the system down into three phases and explains each in detail before taking the field for a live practice.

    You'll learn how to position players based on defensive pressure on the ball. These tactics will give your team options no matter what situation or position they're in.

    Throughout Coach Entlich's 3-5-2 practice session, he keeps 22 players participating in the game for the entire practice. He uses "in-game" coaching points to teach individuals and also stops play occasionally to make team tactical points.

    Phase I - Getting used to the System of Play for a 3-5-2

    Phase I is an unopposed phase, which allows your players to get used to the nuances of positional reads as the game develops. Coach Entlich makes coaching points during play as well as stop action rehearsals as players get used to how they fit in the system.

    Phase II - Adds opposition and forces players to think and make decisions on the fly

    Phase II adds opposition playing in the same formation, but with an adjustment in the midfield that gives you two options on how to play the system.

      One style is more aggressive, using two attacking central midfielders.The other style is more defensive, using two defending central midfielders.

    Coach Entlich sets up an activity that helps bring out individual positional play and descriptions so all players can understand their roles and those of their teammates.

    Phase III - The real game!

    Phase III advances to two teams with goalkeepers in a real game, but with a modification to emphasize the key advantages to using the 3-5-2 system of play. Coach Entlich has players work on playing through the center of the field so when one team is in possession, the other team must have two of their center mids kneel down. This creates an advantage and promotes success in the attack. Your players will absorb and adapt to the formation while being totally engaged in playing the real game.

    This video is a complete dissection of the 3-5-2 style of play and a step-by-step method to incorporate it into your program. Your team will learn the expected runs of all supporting players, how to make decisions on the fly, combining to beat defenders and how to place the ball into dangerous areas.

    68 minutes. 2016.



    RD-05024B: with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 10 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15), 4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 12x Conference Champs

    Attacking soccer means successful soccer in today's game. Teams that attack effectively and as a unit present a constant problem for their opponents. Teaching players to attack as a team is a priority for every coach.

    In a high-octane training session, Jay Entlich demonstrates how to develop the skills necessary to get your players to attack as a team. He uses four phases to build his players' repertoire of offensive attacking strategies. In a progression from small group to full field, Coach Entlich's attacking phases promote opportunities to advance the ball utilizing counterattacks, overlapping, combination play, and number advantages.

    Coach Entlich makes it easy to follow his training session by thoroughly explaining each activity before taking it onto the field with his players.

    Phase 1: 3-2-1 Small-Sided Game

    Coach Entlich uses limited space and numbers to instill the basic principles needed to effectively move through the three zones commonly used in team organization. He introduces a fast-paced 6v3 possession game where offensive players move from one zone to another to creative number advantages and use overlapping runs and combination play to maintain possession. Possession maintained from one end to the other restarts the drill seamlessly, and with ways for both the offense and defense to score points, the game creates the kind of competition in practice that players and coaches love.

    Phase 2: Half Field Exercises

    In Phase 2, the training progress to activities in the final third, emphasizing player decision making and organization to stretch and break down an opponent's defensive organization. Coach Entlich designs the drill to mimic a 4-3-3 formation attacking a 3-5-2 formation, but you could easily adapt the drill to put your players in the formation that best suits your team. With seamless transitions and minimal downtime, this drill will test your players mentally and physically.

    Phase 3: 11v9 Full-Field Play

    Phase 3 moves Coach Entlich's team to the full field, where any turnover results in an 11v9 counterattacking opportunity. This activity sharpens play in and throughout the midfield. Coach Entlich teaches proper supporting runs, driving at a defense, finding the open player and having defenders become part of the attack. Whether it's by overlapping or combination play, your team will learn to create number advantages moving toward the goal

    Phase 4: Full-Field Scrimmage

    Coach Entlich returns the game to the players in 11v11 play, illustrating the effectiveness of concepts taught in the training session.

    Each of Coach Entlich's phases require his players to think on their feet. During each phase, he finds moments in the drills to instruct his players on everything from the proper run to which foot to make a pass with.

    The concepts and activities presented in this training session will teach your players the principles of an attacking mindset to generate scoring opportunities and cause constant problems for your opponents.

    "I have a number of attack oriented training videos and this is a very tightly organized and logical training progression that emphasizes the essential principles of prioritizing player decision making, movement off the ball and finding or creating situations where I have a numerical advantage to attack my opponent. It is a good, solid team tactical training video." - Customer Review

    52 minutes. 2016.



    RD-05024C: with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 10 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15), 4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 12x Conference Champs

    Scoring more goals is the intent of all teams. This video focuses on how you can make that happen for your team. Jay Entlich shows how to create a goal scoring session using three phases and teaches players to recognize why they are missing shots on frame. Using a progression of free shooting, shooting with defense and shooting in a small-sided game, your players will learn when and how to take their best shot on goal.

    Each progression contains variations that allow you to utilize the same rotation. This cuts down on lost time and confusion as you progress through each drill.

    Developing Runs off the Ball

    Starting with a non-defended shooting drill, Coach Entlich breaks down finishing into three different phases. He emphasizes the two main components of finishing:

  • Technique - how you strike a ball.
  • Tactics - when you shoot the ball and how to put yourself in the best place to finish.
  • He keeps instructions "over the top" and keeps play moving and active. He clearly demonstrates when and how to "show" for the ball and when to spread the field for wide play. Your players will learn the visual and verbal cues to improve shooting.

    Combination Play to "Go to Goal" and Increase Scoring Opportunities

    The progression of activities moves from unopposed to 1v1 and builds in a logical progression to 2v2, 3v3, 4v4 and 5v5. The activities get more complex as more players are added, but the coaching points made in the unopposed and 1v1 play are applicable as the numbers increase. Coach Entlich moves the session along from discussing angles of the target forward and their preparation touch, to players competing in restricted areas against defense to apply what they learned in the first two phases.

    Practice builds up to players being put in situations where they have to make decisions on when to take shots and finding the best opportunities to finish. The progression includes many teaching movements:

    • Don't hit under the ball.
    • Don't reach for the ball on a shot.
    • Try to stay central as much as possible when putting a shot on frame.

    Developing the Outside Attack Option

    Coach Entlich spend considerable time showing and teaching the use the outside attack option from player positioning to the supporting runs by players off the ball. His progression is easy to follow and very logical. Your players will learn the importance of stretching the width of the attack for added chances to play the ball into dangerous shooting spaces.

    Coach Entlich has an answer for all finishing problems and provides specific tips for how to take on a defender and get a shot off. This is a great video for any coach looking to improve their team's effectiveness around the net.

    53 minutes. 2016.



    RD-05024D: with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 10 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15), 4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 12x Conference Champs

    In order to build an attack a team must learn how to possess the ball.

    Jay Entlich shows how to create a possession-oriented session. In three phases, he teaches players to recognize when to keep the ball and when to advance it up the field. Using a progression of small-sided games your players will learn how to retain the ball.

    Develop Soccer Decision Making

    The professional players that thrive in possession-oriented systems are not just some of the most skilled, they are also the ones that make the best decisions on the field. Coach Entlich demonstrates three games with variations that require players to think quickly and succeed mentally while keeping the ball. Players must be able to make quick decisions about when to pass forward and when to pass back. Each game in Coach Entlich's training sessions has players move the ball back and forth between zones to simulate moving the ball between the different levels of a formation.

    Speed of play is vital as the ball moves quickly when being passed. To improve speed of play, players must relocate when the ball travels to open up for their teammates. Coach Entlich comes back to this point throughout the video and his games show how vital this skill is to maintaining possession.

    Teach Possession Skills M

    The focus of this video is on the mental aspect of possessing the ball, but that doesn't mean that Coach Entlich ignores the physical skills necessary to keep the ball. He finds teachable moments in each drill throughout the training session to reinforce skills that make keeping possession easier.

    In order to maintain possession, players need to have a great first touch and position their bodies to receive a ball and move it quickly to a teammate. Coach Entlich finds opportunities in the ebb and flow of the games to coach his players.

    Position-Specific Training

    While many possession drills confine players to a box, Coach Entlich emphasizes functionality by putting players in their natural positions. Each game features a player in a target role, and others put emphasis on a holding midfielder. Coach Entlich's final game requires a back four to maintain possession and connect with a three-player midfield who look to keep the ball before finding a target forward. When your players experience success possessing the ball in their role in practice, success in games is the next step.

    The games Coach Entlich demonstrate will sharpen your players' mental and physical skills on the field. Starting with small passes in tight spaces, to playing in a fast-paced exercise that encourages lines of play to work together, you will be able to teach your team how to possess and advance the ball successfully.

    55 minutes. 2016.




    0 0

    with Jay Hoffman,
    Centre College Head Women's Coach; 2015 NCAA DIII Final Four;
    4x SAA Conference Champions (2012-15)

    One of the top tactical trends in Europe is breaking the last line of defense and the different ways a team can achieve this. In this video, Jay Hoffman demonstrates how he teaches his team to break the lines and the techniques that have made his team an attacking threat. These tactics have given his team back to back NCAA Final Four and Elite Eight appearances.

    Coach Hoffman shows you how important it is to have the correct team shape, timing of runs, proper decision-making and the right attitude toward breaking the lines. He provides in-depth illustrations, both on a white board and on the field, to show these different ideas on how to break the lines. He explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the games:

    • Good communication before you pass the ball
    • Vertical, lateral & "C" cup runs by the high target player
    • Runs that trigger other runs going into the final third
    • Getting players to the correct foot, which will lay the foundation to break the lines

    Mastering the Tactic of Breaking Lines

    Hoffman has specific instructions to apply to your training sessions. All five of these training instructions can be applied in different aspects of the game.

    • Three Step Rule - This rule encourages getting away after making a pass to create space
    • Leave and Replace - Leave a space to create space
    • Play Faster but Keep Possession - One touch is the fastest way, but, it's not always the best way to play
    • Pass the Ball Where the Defender is Not - Look for the open foot or side away from the defender to help retain possession
    • Play the Player that is Moving - Don't go for the "home run" ball when it isn't on

    Practice Segments

    Hoffman develops a fluid session that encourages players to constantly think about how to get behind the line of defense. One of the things he does well is create exercises that reflect the true speed of the game. His progressions within each exercise are meaningful and his restrictions challenge players to try different ways to break in behind the last line of defense.

    He begins with a three-man unopposed passing pattern that lays the foundation to his team's ability to break the line. The emphasis in this drill is that the players develop a good sense of rhythm when passing, the decision-making based on which foot the player receives with, and how to play based on the type of pressure the player has on their back.

    The second progression is a 4v1 small sided game. This is where he trains his players to play using the correct shape, runs and decision-making to be able to break the line. Hoffman demonstrates two progressions within the 4v1 that help drive the point home with the type of runs needed to be dangerous. After the 4v1, he adds more pressure to make it 4v2, 4v3 and 4v4. During these games, the focus changes more to the decision-making based on the defender's positioning and implementing Hoffman's five training principles.

    The third segment features a 4v4 game using all three thirds of the field. It's here the players try and keep possession in the middle third to be able to find that entry ball in the opponent's final third. This small-sided game does a great job of getting your players to make the correct runs off the ball to be dangerous. After players grasp playing in the thirds, they play a normal game to find the solutions within the game.

    Every coach must teach their team how to break down opposition lines - Coach Hoffman does that, and more, in this innovative video!

    57 minutes. 2016


    0 0

    with Jay Hoffman,
    Centre College Head Women's Coach; 2015 NCAA DIII Final Four;
    4x SAA Conference Champions (2012-15)

    To be successful in the attack, you need more than just your forwards making attacking runs. You also need your midfield players to expose the space from the opposition's back line as well.

    Ask Jay Hoffman for the key to his team's success and he will say the midfield. "If you win the midfield, you're going to win games," says Hoffman. This DVD will show you how Coach Hoffman trains his midfield - and how you can train yours - to break through an opponent's defense in this complete practice session.

    Five Instructions for Player Development

    Coach Hoffman preaches five principles to each player in his program to get them to play his desired style. Besides helping his players develop on the field, Coach Hoffman sees these instructions as vital to helping his midfield play more dangerously and be able to make passes behind the defense.

    Throughout the training session, Hoffman references moving after the pass and creating space for dangerous runs. He reminds his players to play quickly, but not at the expense of losing possession. He also encourages passing to the player that is making a run and to the foot of the player away from the defender. With these principles implemented, your midfield will be more dangerous when attacking.

    Teach Attacking Movements

    Coach Hoffman doesn't expect his players to move effectively on a full field without first teaching them to attack in numbers in small groups. The Centre College warm-up focuses on player movement while incorporating the five instructions: the players work on splitting defenders with the pass and making overlapping runs while passing to the correct foot and moving to create space for the runs. The warm-up transitions to a 4v2 possession game, where players must maintain possession while playing as quickly as possible.

    Attacking from the Midfield on the Full Field

    When play transitions to the full field, Coach Hoffman shows how his three-player midfield and two outside backs must combine and connect to his three forwards to attack successfully. With the field separated into zones, the drill starts off as 5v2 in the midfield zone and 3v1 in the attacking zone. Once his players start having success, he progresses this to 5v4, 3v2 with the same concepts.

    The final drill Coach Hoffman demonstrates is an 8v8 game using two-thirds of the field going to two big goals. It's here that he wants players to apply what has been taught from the small sided games into the match itself.

    Coach Hoffman pushes his players to attack the goal, and he finds perfect times to stop the games to coach his players. With such a numbers advantage, the attacking team is meant to experience success; Coach Hoffman adds defenders and encourages movements between zones to make drills more challenging for his players.

    Coach Hoffman is right when he says that the team that controls the midfield has the best chance of winning the game. If you want to help your midfield control the game, learn from a coach who has experienced success at the collegiate level doing just that. With this video, your midfield will soon be breaking down all opposing defenses.

    63 minutes. 2016


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